Techerous

My name is Bill, I am a recent graduate in Information Sciences and Technology from Penn State University and this is a place for me to post or give my 2 cents on the fascinating world of technology. I am now working for a pretty big technology related company whose name I will leave out just to avoid any possible complications, however far-fetched them happening may be. Music gets included from time to time as well.

April 7, 2014 12:15 am January 4, 2014 12:04 am
"If you use Netflix, you’ve probably wondered about the specific genres that it suggests to you. Some of them just seem so specific that it’s absurd. Emotional Fight-the-System Documentaries? Period Pieces About Royalty Based on Real Life? Foreign Satanic Stories from the 1980s?

If Netflix can show such tiny slices of cinema to any given user, and they have 40 million users, how vast did their set of “personalized genres” need to be to describe the entire Hollywood universe?

This idle wonder turned to rabid fascination when I realized that I could capture each and every microgenre that Netflix’s algorithm has ever created.

Through a combination of elbow grease and spam-level repetition, we discovered that Netflix possesses not several hundred genres, or even several thousand, but 76,897 unique ways to describe types of movies…

…What emerged from the work is this conclusion: Netflix has meticulously analyzed and tagged every movie and TV show imaginable. They possess a stockpile of data about Hollywood entertainment that is absolutely unprecedented. The genres that I scraped and that we caricature above are just the surface manifestation of this deeper database."

Alexis C. Madrigal, The Atlantic. How Netflix Reverse Engineered Hollywood. (via futurejournalismproject)

The tools Netflix is building to analyze data are great.  I also love their attitude, they will create something revolutionary and give it to the world rather than automatically monetizing it.  I think this is a common link amongst the more innovative companies today.

October 9, 2013 10:39 pm
"The business is changing so rapidly, and there are now so many opportunities to make content available in new ways — and at new cost structures — that I would be surprised if we don’t see someone actually pull this off within the next five years. It’s going to require the right TV show — one with a passionate fanbase willing to pay extra — and it’s going to require someone getting in way ahead of time to ensure the ending allowed for it, but if the planets align just so, this will happen. And if the audience goes along with it, it will happen more and more and more."
September 18, 2013 12:01 am

What Does Netflix Have on Spotify?

Obviously there’s some pretty big differences, but I have been thinking a lot about the new age of packaging forms of intellectual property and find myself coming back to comparing these 2 business models.  Kevin Spacey recently spoke about the beauty of the simplicity in Netflix’s model, give the people what they want, when they want it at a reasonable price. In some ways Spotify offers a similar type of plan, however whereas Netflix is encouraging creativity and entry for quality, Spotify seems to be benefiting the same tiny sector of the industry that has been doing relatively okay since the first mp3 was created. How can Spotify encourage top-level quality that has been lost in the profit crisis it’s industry is facing.  It seems that Netflix does this by acting as a channel itself and taking risks.  What if Spotify signed bands directly as if it was a label itself. Obviously there are a lot of factors I’m not aware of in these businesses and have barely scratched the surface of the ones I myself am even aware of.  Does anyone else have thoughts on this?

August 28, 2013 8:23 pm August 21, 2013 6:29 pm
Tumblr Says Data Corruption, Not A Hack, Responsible For Strange Posts Appearing On Users’ Blogs | TechCrunch

nudityandnerdery:

shoebiedoo:

They’re trying to say that this only lasted around 15 minutes, but that’s not true. My feed was fucked for at least 4 hours. It started around 9/10 for me, and I went to sleep around 3.
I lost maybe 2 posts. But I don’t post that much. I couldn’t reply to posts. I couldn’t reply to messages.

Basically, I got to look at Devin’s cherry cheesecake and Rune’s unicorn poop for hours as the top two posts on my dash (which is great because those things are great) but they were all being followed by posts from people I don’t follow. 
And, again, I don’t care about porn on my dash. I just care when it’s porn from people that I don’t follow. It just seems like bad new for Tumblr considering how far they’ve tried to distance themselves from the naughty side of Tumblr.

Seriously, Tumblr? It was at least three and a half hours. It ate at least one of my posts. At least the posts I didn’t make are finally gone from my blog, but still.

Get your shit together, Tumblr. Or at least admit that something was fucked up.

It’s interesting how user groups respond to issues in the same way. Social media sites give us the ability to create content and our reaction to losing it is very similar to losing television and forms of media solely for consuming. I suppose it would make more sense for social media to prompt even bigger of a reaction given that.

June 5, 2013 8:42 pm
Nielsen TV Ratings Will Soon Include Viewers Who Watch Online | Underwire | Wired.com

took them long enough.

November 18, 2012 12:57 pm

Just watched a quarter of an episode of the new Silicon Valley reality show on Bravo

Maybe it’s because it’s about a subject I’m somewhat familiar with, but it might be the most appalling thing I’ve seen from reality television.  Hundreds of companies trying to revolutionize hardware, finance, communication and much more but let’s follow 2 companies trying to help people lose weight.

November 11, 2012 11:07 pm July 18, 2012 11:13 pm
theatlantic:

How the Dark Knight Became Dark Again

Batman has been so successfully remade in recent years that we scarcely remember how, for a generation, the Dark Knight lived in the public imagination as a pot-bellied caped crusader with a goofy sidekick. ABC’s live-action Batman TV series, which ran from 1966 to 1968, was deliberately campy (“To the Batpole!”) and created a long-enduring association between the superhero and the cartoonish onomopeias “Pow!” “Zap!” and “Wham!”
The story of how the farcical Batman of the ’60s transformed into the solemn one of today mirrors the elevation of the comic book in general from belittled kiddie fare to the subject of academic inquiry and box-office-breaking, R-rated action movies. It’s also a story of a 73-year-old franchise returning to its roots, reflecting its times, and helping build a multibillion dollar industry that churns out branded merchandise, video games, theme park attractions and annual conventions. And it’s the story of one fan named Michael Uslan, who, as an 8th grader in the ’60s, made a vow to save Batman.
Read more.


Never realized one person was so instrumental to how Batman has been adapted on the big screen.  I also love his method of creating controversy in the middle.

theatlantic:

How the Dark Knight Became Dark Again

Batman has been so successfully remade in recent years that we scarcely remember how, for a generation, the Dark Knight lived in the public imagination as a pot-bellied caped crusader with a goofy sidekick. ABC’s live-action Batman TV series, which ran from 1966 to 1968, was deliberately campy (“To the Batpole!”) and created a long-enduring association between the superhero and the cartoonish onomopeias “Pow!” “Zap!” and “Wham!”

The story of how the farcical Batman of the ’60s transformed into the solemn one of today mirrors the elevation of the comic book in general from belittled kiddie fare to the subject of academic inquiry and box-office-breaking, R-rated action movies. It’s also a story of a 73-year-old franchise returning to its roots, reflecting its times, and helping build a multibillion dollar industry that churns out branded merchandise, video games, theme park attractions and annual conventions. And it’s the story of one fan named Michael Uslan, who, as an 8th grader in the ’60s, made a vow to save Batman.

Read more.

Never realized one person was so instrumental to how Batman has been adapted on the big screen.  I also love his method of creating controversy in the middle.