Techerous

My name is Bill, I am a recent graduate in Information Sciences and Technology from Penn State University and this is a place for me to post or give my 2 cents on the fascinating world of technology. I am now working for a pretty big technology related company whose name I will leave out just to avoid any possible complications, however far-fetched them happening may be. Music gets included from time to time as well.

April 13, 2014 8:32 pm
5 rules for using the Internet after ‘Heartbleed’

Even without Heartbleed this are pretty good suggestions.

April 8, 2014 10:39 pm
Urgent security update

staff:

Bad news. A major vulnerability, known as “Heartbleed,” has been disclosed for the technology that powers encryption across the majority of the internet. That includes Tumblr.

We have no evidence of any breach and, like most networks, our team took immediate action to fix the issue.

But this…

I’m guessing most people have heard about this by now.  This is an issue on the server-side so don’t change your password unless instructed by that site to do so.  Changing it before they have patched the issue just leaves your new password equally vulnerable.

March 24, 2014 11:40 pm March 13, 2014 6:49 pm
Target Warned of Hack But Didn't Immediately Respond: Report - NBC News

techheat:

Target received warnings from its internal security system about last year’s massive breach before the data was stolen, but failed to act, according to a …

Via NBC News
February 23, 2014 12:34 pm
Windows Phone to get long-awaited enterprise update | PCWorld

I’ve always said the strategy for Windows Phone should be to target the enterprise. The consumer market has been decided, iOS and Android aren’t giving up any ground, go after the users that involuntarily switched off Blackberry. Now the question is is it too late?

February 20, 2014 8:54 pm
Red Cell lab uses military tactics to ensure THON security — College of Information Sciences and Technology

There’s something odd at first about reading that “military tactics” will be used for security at a fundraising event.  However this is a pretty cool thing to read about, interesting study happening at the school I graduated from.

September 8, 2013 1:12 am
Internet experts want security revamp after NSA revelations
January 23, 2013 12:00 am
"In this sense, the decision to mothball the tech would be a violation of the developers’ ethical principles. But the argument is about more than whether putting the tech back in the hands of the public is the right thing to do. “The biggest issue we saw with all of the commercial election software we used was that it’s only updated every four years,” says Ryan. It was these outdated options that convinced team Obama to build all the campaign tech in-house. If the code OFA built was put on ice at the DNC until 2016, it would become effectively worthless. “None of that will be useful in four years, technology moves too fast,” said Ryan. “But if our work was open and people were forking it and improving it all the time, then it keeps up with changes as we go.”"
December 23, 2012 2:36 pm
Brace Yourselves, RIM is Coming Back With a Bang!

Currently going through the same thing with my father.  While I was able to persuade him to try out Android (and by no means does he not enjoy using his Droid Razr Maxx HD) I still constantly hear the paranoid comments on what is happening with his email and data.  It’s hard to believe that if given a decent product he wouldn’t gladly jump back on the Blackberry Enterprise System.

August 11, 2012 12:33 am
longreads:

A writer loses everything on his iPhone, his iPad and his Mac—including all of the photos from the first year and a half of his daughter’s life—after a hacker infiltrates his Amazon, Apple, Gmail and Twitter accounts:

Had I been regularly backing up the data on my MacBook, I wouldn’t have had to worry about losing more than a year’s worth of photos, covering the entire lifespan of my daughter, or documents and e-mails that I had stored in no other location.
Those security lapses are my fault, and I deeply, deeply regret them.
But what happened to me exposes vital security flaws in several customer service systems, most notably Apple’s and Amazon’s. Apple tech support gave the hackers access to my iCloud account. Amazon tech support gave them the ability to see a piece of information — a partial credit card number — that Apple used to release information. In short, the very four digits that Amazon considers unimportant enough to display in the clear on the web are precisely the same ones that Apple considers secure enough to perform identity verification. The disconnect exposes flaws in data management policies endemic to the entire technology industry, and points to a looming nightmare as we enter the era of cloud computing and connected devices.

“How Apple and Amazon Security Flaws Led to My Epic Hacking.” — Mat Honan, Wired
More Honan

I’m almost embarrassed by how I feel reading this story.  It really made me realize that someone accessing your online profiles can almost be as scary as physically getting robbed these days.  I knew it was silly but I really did feel like I was reading somebody’s tale of finding out their home had been broken into.  I don’t understand how he was able to talk to the hacker, I would have been too enraged to even type a sentence to the guy, but it does provide some valuable insight into who does things like this and what their motivation is.  We throw around these idealistic and self-righteous purposes but at the end of the day you are still victimizing someone.  Hopefully we can all learn something from Mat’s story and take precautions to better protect our data in the era of the cloud.  Also take notice to how much of a role social engineering had in this, I feel he doesn’t stress that point enough.

longreads:

A writer loses everything on his iPhone, his iPad and his Mac—including all of the photos from the first year and a half of his daughter’s life—after a hacker infiltrates his Amazon, Apple, Gmail and Twitter accounts:

Had I been regularly backing up the data on my MacBook, I wouldn’t have had to worry about losing more than a year’s worth of photos, covering the entire lifespan of my daughter, or documents and e-mails that I had stored in no other location.

Those security lapses are my fault, and I deeply, deeply regret them.

But what happened to me exposes vital security flaws in several customer service systems, most notably Apple’s and Amazon’s. Apple tech support gave the hackers access to my iCloud account. Amazon tech support gave them the ability to see a piece of information — a partial credit card number — that Apple used to release information. In short, the very four digits that Amazon considers unimportant enough to display in the clear on the web are precisely the same ones that Apple considers secure enough to perform identity verification. The disconnect exposes flaws in data management policies endemic to the entire technology industry, and points to a looming nightmare as we enter the era of cloud computing and connected devices.

“How Apple and Amazon Security Flaws Led to My Epic Hacking.” — Mat Honan, Wired

More Honan

I’m almost embarrassed by how I feel reading this story.  It really made me realize that someone accessing your online profiles can almost be as scary as physically getting robbed these days.  I knew it was silly but I really did feel like I was reading somebody’s tale of finding out their home had been broken into.  I don’t understand how he was able to talk to the hacker, I would have been too enraged to even type a sentence to the guy, but it does provide some valuable insight into who does things like this and what their motivation is.  We throw around these idealistic and self-righteous purposes but at the end of the day you are still victimizing someone.  Hopefully we can all learn something from Mat’s story and take precautions to better protect our data in the era of the cloud.  Also take notice to how much of a role social engineering had in this, I feel he doesn’t stress that point enough.