Techerous

My name is Bill, I am a recent graduate in Information Sciences and Technology from Penn State University and this is a place for me to post or give my 2 cents on the fascinating world of technology. I am now working for a pretty big technology related company whose name I will leave out just to avoid any possible complications, however far-fetched them happening may be. Music gets included from time to time as well.

July 22, 2014 10:28 am
Spotify, MTV/VH1/CMT Announce Major Partnership | hypebot

mediaor:

Reposted from http://ift.tt/UpvK2A on July 22, 2014 at 10:07AM

If winning the battle for streaming music supremacy is about partnerships, Spotify scored a major victory today. MTV,VH1,and CMT today announced a significant marketing deal that makes Spotify the preferred streaming music service…

I can see a lot of bad coming from this.

July 18, 2014 8:09 pm

Why Music Is The Next Big Battle For The Tech Titans | Forbes

mediaor:

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1mkuWmi on July 17, 2014 at 05:54AM

What is the big attraction in music to the global tech-titans? It might be that we are on the cusp of redrawing e-commerce.

It seems that it’s agreed-upon that human curation is the focus of music platforms for now.  It’s not clear how that will solve what at least I see as the main issue which is that artists need to be fairly compensated, but it could be a start.  I hope that we find a different way besides advertising to make money on internet content in general soon though.

July 14, 2014 8:41 pm

Taylor Swift Gets It From Her Perspective… But Not Mine | Digital Music News

mediaor:

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1mPGjHi on July 14, 2014 at 07:18PM

Let me first start off by saying that I’m a fan of Swift’s. Now, before you chastise this 29 year old dude for his music…

The post Taylor Swift Gets It From Her Perspective… But Not Mine appeared first on Digital Music News.

Nails everything I found wrong with her editorial.

July 7, 2014 11:26 pm
Taylor Swift: Forming a bond with fans in the future will mean constantly providing them with the element of surprise.

I’m not going to lie, I was actually expecting to be pleasantly surprised. I’m not a fan of her music, but seeing her published in the WSJ I thought maybe this was a well-researched, thought out piece by an industry insider who has exposure to the most successful sectors of it at the moment. Instead, Taylor Swift comes off as naive and pompous, completely disregarding that at least a portion of her success comes from the amount of money and resources being poured into placing her music in every outlet through which people discover music.  She almost gets there when she mentions her Myspace following a decade ago, and I certainly don’t disagree with her belief on how artists need to connect with the fans in the digital age, but Taylor Swift becomes Taylor Swift through her label promotions, not simply because her music is “truer” than everything else out there.  She shows no attempt to really explain the economics of the modern music industry or what will really keep it going in the future.  Surprising your audience has been around since The Grateful Dead were spending 90% of their show on a jam session, The Who were smashing their instruments, Elvis was shaking his hips and much much more. If creative surprises were the single solution to the music industry The Mars Volta would have been the biggest band in the world 4 years ago.

June 17, 2014 7:37 am
How One Generation Was Single-Handedly Able To Kill The Music Industry | Music Think Tank (primary) RSS

mediaor:

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1n93itd on June 17, 2014 at 07:00AM

We’re in the midst of the greatest music industry disruption of the past 100 years. A fundamental shift has occurred — a shift that Millennials are driving.

For the first time, record sales aren’t enough to make an artist’s…

May 24, 2014 1:24 pm
analyticisms:

#SaturdaySadStat: any time we see increased revenues paralleling increased net losses, we start wondering about the viability of the business model…

analyticisms:

#SaturdaySadStat: any time we see increased revenues paralleling increased net losses, we start wondering about the viability of the business model…

September 18, 2013 12:01 am

What Does Netflix Have on Spotify?

Obviously there’s some pretty big differences, but I have been thinking a lot about the new age of packaging forms of intellectual property and find myself coming back to comparing these 2 business models.  Kevin Spacey recently spoke about the beauty of the simplicity in Netflix’s model, give the people what they want, when they want it at a reasonable price. In some ways Spotify offers a similar type of plan, however whereas Netflix is encouraging creativity and entry for quality, Spotify seems to be benefiting the same tiny sector of the industry that has been doing relatively okay since the first mp3 was created. How can Spotify encourage top-level quality that has been lost in the profit crisis it’s industry is facing.  It seems that Netflix does this by acting as a channel itself and taking risks.  What if Spotify signed bands directly as if it was a label itself. Obviously there are a lot of factors I’m not aware of in these businesses and have barely scratched the surface of the ones I myself am even aware of.  Does anyone else have thoughts on this?

June 24, 2013 9:52 pm

Pink Floyd blasts Pandora for ‘tricking’ artists with petition | The Register - Business: Media

mediaor:

Reposted from http://bit.ly/14mOGOM on June 24, 2013 at 08:43PM

Musicians asked to ‘support their own pay cut’

Three members of iconic British psychedelic rockers Pink Floyd have penned an editorial condemning the practices of streaming music service Pandora, which they say has been trying to trick recording artists into cutting their own pay.…

June 17, 2013 11:36 pm
Eventbrite Survey Finds EDM Fan Behavior Differs Greatly From Other Music Fans
It’s funny because I keep hearing how EDM is one of the only scenes that really brings in revenue for the music industry these days and how the fans are willing to shell out $100 a show. I think the kids in that scene, because they’re so big on social media, inflate every event to such a huge level that they see it as necessary to attend for their entire social needs.  because promotion is such a huge part of what they do, every event needs to be “extraordinary” unlike something like the indie rock scene where they almost look to go to as many shows as possible for as little money because it’s about seeing as much as possible than being able to say that every experience you had was awesome. It’s kind of the same behavior as you see at every party now, making sure we have pictures and sharing all the fun that is being had is almost as important as the party itself.

Eventbrite Survey Finds EDM Fan Behavior Differs Greatly From Other Music Fans

It’s funny because I keep hearing how EDM is one of the only scenes that really brings in revenue for the music industry these days and how the fans are willing to shell out $100 a show. I think the kids in that scene, because they’re so big on social media, inflate every event to such a huge level that they see it as necessary to attend for their entire social needs.  because promotion is such a huge part of what they do, every event needs to be “extraordinary” unlike something like the indie rock scene where they almost look to go to as many shows as possible for as little money because it’s about seeing as much as possible than being able to say that every experience you had was awesome. It’s kind of the same behavior as you see at every party now, making sure we have pictures and sharing all the fun that is being had is almost as important as the party itself.

February 26, 2013 10:50 pm
Music Industry Reports a Rise in Sales, Crediting Digital

infoneer-pulse:

The music industry, the first media business to be consumed by the digital revolution, said on Tuesday that its global sales rose last year for the first time since 1999, raising hopes that a long-sought recovery might have begun.

The increase, of 0.3 percent, was tiny, and the total revenue, $16.5 billion, was a far cry from the $38 billion that the industry took in at its peak more than a decade ago. Still, even if it is not time for the record companies to party like it’s 1999, the figures, reported Tuesday by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, provide significant encouragement.

“It’s clear that 2012 saw the global recording industry moving onto the road to recovery,” said Frances Moore, chief executive of the federation, which is based in London. “There’s a palpable buzz in the air that I haven’t felt for a long time.”

» via The New York Times (Subscription may be required for some content)

Interesting how services such as Spotify are starting to have the effect the industry was hoping they would. However it would be nice if we found a way to turn it around that really rewarded the artist again as the royalties received from Pandora and Spotify are ridiculously small.