Techerous

My name is Bill, I am a recent graduate in Information Sciences and Technology from Penn State University and this is a place for me to post or give my 2 cents on the fascinating world of technology. I am now working for a pretty big technology related company whose name I will leave out just to avoid any possible complications, however far-fetched them happening may be. Music gets included from time to time as well.

December 5, 2013 10:02 pm
House of Representatives passes widely supported bill to fight patent trolls

From what I am reading this is an important first step.  Basically it makes it so that if you sue somebody for infringement, you better be damn sure you have a case.  However I do think that if we truly want to revive an environment where patents actually encourage innovation it requires an overall of how patents actually work.  Most, if not all, patent law was written years before the internet and other key aspects of the modern environment existed.  The 30 year time period and some types of innovations protected are no longer relevant.

January 9, 2013 6:34 pm
thedailywhat:

Anonymous Operation of the Day: Legalize DDoS

Members of Anonymous are jumping on the White House petition bandwagon in an attempt to “make distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks a legal form of protesting” under freedom of speech, The Daily Dot reports. A popular tactic that’s long been associated with the infamous hacking and trolling collective, DDoS attacks have been steadily on the rise in recent years with easier access to automated software programs and its frequent appearance in the news media. As of 3 p.m. (ET), the petition has less than 500 signatures, which isn’t an impressive number but considering the reputation of the organizers, this may all change really soon.


I’m sorry but this is an awful idea that would protect those malicious intent and promote negative behavior.  Perfectly reasonable organizations would be just as much at risk as those you deem worthy of protest.

thedailywhat:

Anonymous Operation of the Day: Legalize DDoS

Members of Anonymous are jumping on the White House petition bandwagon in an attempt to “make distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks a legal form of protesting” under freedom of speech, The Daily Dot reports. A popular tactic that’s long been associated with the infamous hacking and trolling collective, DDoS attacks have been steadily on the rise in recent years with easier access to automated software programs and its frequent appearance in the news media. As of 3 p.m. (ET), the petition has less than 500 signatures, which isn’t an impressive number but considering the reputation of the organizers, this may all change really soon.

I’m sorry but this is an awful idea that would protect those malicious intent and promote negative behavior.  Perfectly reasonable organizations would be just as much at risk as those you deem worthy of protest.

(via burialonthepresidio)

December 22, 2012 11:20 pm
Net Neutrality, Data-Cap Legislation Lands in Senate

unexpectedtech:

A proposal forbidding internet service providers from turning the data-cap meter off to grant a so-called internet fast lane to preferential online services was introduced Thursday in the Senate.

The bill by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) comes a week after a report found that the institutionalization of data caps by ISPs is geared toward profiteering rather than the stated goal of managing traffic congestion.

“A covered internet service provider may not, for purposes of measuring data usage or otherwise, provide preferential treatment of data that is based on the source or the content of the data,” (.pdf) Wyden’s bill reads.

Ars Technica noted that Comcast had not counted its Xbox video-streaming app against its data caps. Comcast, however, no longer enforces its data caps.

“Data caps create challenges for consumers and run the risk of undermining innovation in the digital economy if they are imposed bluntly and not designed to truly manage network congestion,” Wyden said in a statement.

Among other things, the proposal demands a standardized method for measuring data and also questions data caps altogether. That’s because it grants the Federal Communications Commission with regulatory power over data-cap pricing.

“The commission shall evaluate a data cap proposed by an internet service provider to determine whether the data cap functions to reasonably limit network congestion in a manner that does not unnecessarily discourage use of the internet,” according to the proposal.

That means internet companies might have to explain why the caps are imposed at low-traffic times, such as in the middle of the night.

The proposal was immediately applauded by the digital rights group Public Knowledge.

(via unexpectedtech-deactivated20130)

October 2, 2012 10:12 pm
Judge decries “excessive” copyright and software patent protections | Ars Technica

“The problem of excessive patent protection is at present best illustrated by the software industry. This is a progressive, dynamic industry rife with invention. But the conditions that make patent protection essential in the pharmaceutical industry are absent. Nowadays most software innovation is incremental, created by teams of software engineers at modest cost, and also ephemeral—most software inventions are quickly superseded. Software innovation tends to be piecemeal—not entire devices, but components, so that a software device (a cellphone, a tablet, a laptop, etc.) may have tens of thousands, even hundreds of thousands, of separate components (bits of software code or bits of hardware), each one arguably patentable. The result is huge patent thickets, creating rich opportunities for trying to hamstring competitors by suing for infringement—and also for infringing, and then challenging the validity of the patent when the patentee sues you.”

September 18, 2012 11:51 pm September 1, 2012 11:02 am
Police embrace social media as crime-fighting tool - CNN.com

I personally wouldn’t say anything in this is surprising, but it’s a good article to confirm how law enforcement is using social media. I don’t see anything wrong with how they have applied the policies of the bricks-and-mortar world to online but like the bricks-and-mortar one you should be aware of your rights and what you may be making available to whom.

August 25, 2012 1:51 pm
"Today’s verdict should not be viewed as a win for Apple, but as a loss for the American consumer. It will lead to fewer choices, less innovation, and potentially higher prices. It is unfortunate that patent law can be manipulated to give one company a monopoly over rectangles with rounded corners, or technology that is being improved every day by Samsung and other companies."
August 16, 2012 11:26 pm
‘Friends’ can share your Facebook profile with the government, court rules

infoneer-pulse:

A federal judge has ruled that investigators can go through your Facebook profile if one of your friends gives them permission to do so. The decision, which is part of a New York City racketeering trial, comes as courts struggle to define privacy and civil liberties in the age of social media.

In an order issued on Friday, US District Judge William Pauley III ruled that accused gangster Melvin Colon can’t rely on the Fourth Amendment to suppress Facebook evidence that led to his indictment. Colon had argued that federal investigators violated his privacy by tapping into his profile through an informant who was one of this Facebook friends.

The informant’s Facebook friendship served to open an online window onto Colon’s alleged gangster life, revealing messages he posted about violent acts and threats to rival gang members. The government used this information to obtain a search warrant for the rest of Colon’s Facebook account. The Colon information is part of a larger investigation into crack-dealing and murder in the Bronx.

» via GigaOM

June 30, 2012 2:19 am
Samsung Barred From U.S. Nexus Phone Sales in Apple Suit

I don’t understand how this is any more infringement than any other android device.  This better not result in the Galaxy S3 getting blocked or I’m going to be pissed.

June 11, 2012 8:35 pm
Websites to be forced to identify trolls under new measures

infoneer-pulse:

Websites will soon to be forced to identify people who have posted defamatory messages online.

New government proposals say victims have a right to know who is behind malicious messages without the need for costly legal battles.

The powers will be balanced by measures to prevent false claims in order to get material removed.

» via BBC

Before you get too worked up this is only in Britain.  It presents an interesting question though, have we seen too much abuse, or is the principle of anonymity still a vital aspect of the internet?