Techerous

My name is Bill, I am a recent graduate in Information Sciences and Technology from Penn State University and this is a place for me to post or give my 2 cents on the fascinating world of technology. I am now working for a pretty big technology related company whose name I will leave out just to avoid any possible complications, however far-fetched them happening may be. Music gets included from time to time as well.

May 22, 2013 7:56 am
gold-slugs:

Microsoft unveiled its new Xbox One Tuesday, displaying a device that takes new steps in game consoles’ journey to becoming all-purpose entertainment and communication devices. The new console replaces the Xbox 360, which has been on the market for nearly eight years.
One of the new device’s most striking features is the ability to run multiple apps at once — and to split a TV screen into different tasks. That means Xbox One owners will be able to watch live TV, while taking part in a Skype video chat, or surfing the web. And many of those tasks can be accomplished by using either hand gestures or voice commands.
Continue Reading


Not a gamer but as a technical analyst it seems to me this is a case of absolutely beautiful hardware at the sacrifice of application. Haven’t seen too many gamers happy about it’s overloaded purpose and seem to think it sacrifices it’s original one, gameplay. Thoughts?

gold-slugs:

Microsoft unveiled its new Xbox One Tuesday, displaying a device that takes new steps in game consoles’ journey to becoming all-purpose entertainment and communication devices. The new console replaces the Xbox 360, which has been on the market for nearly eight years.

One of the new device’s most striking features is the ability to run multiple apps at once — and to split a TV screen into different tasks. That means Xbox One owners will be able to watch live TV, while taking part in a Skype video chat, or surfing the web. And many of those tasks can be accomplished by using either hand gestures or voice commands.

Continue Reading

Not a gamer but as a technical analyst it seems to me this is a case of absolutely beautiful hardware at the sacrifice of application. Haven’t seen too many gamers happy about it’s overloaded purpose and seem to think it sacrifices it’s original one, gameplay. Thoughts?

(via graphicaluserinterface)

November 11, 2012 11:07 pm July 18, 2012 11:13 pm
theatlantic:

How the Dark Knight Became Dark Again

Batman has been so successfully remade in recent years that we scarcely remember how, for a generation, the Dark Knight lived in the public imagination as a pot-bellied caped crusader with a goofy sidekick. ABC’s live-action Batman TV series, which ran from 1966 to 1968, was deliberately campy (“To the Batpole!”) and created a long-enduring association between the superhero and the cartoonish onomopeias “Pow!” “Zap!” and “Wham!”
The story of how the farcical Batman of the ’60s transformed into the solemn one of today mirrors the elevation of the comic book in general from belittled kiddie fare to the subject of academic inquiry and box-office-breaking, R-rated action movies. It’s also a story of a 73-year-old franchise returning to its roots, reflecting its times, and helping build a multibillion dollar industry that churns out branded merchandise, video games, theme park attractions and annual conventions. And it’s the story of one fan named Michael Uslan, who, as an 8th grader in the ’60s, made a vow to save Batman.
Read more.


Never realized one person was so instrumental to how Batman has been adapted on the big screen.  I also love his method of creating controversy in the middle.

theatlantic:

How the Dark Knight Became Dark Again

Batman has been so successfully remade in recent years that we scarcely remember how, for a generation, the Dark Knight lived in the public imagination as a pot-bellied caped crusader with a goofy sidekick. ABC’s live-action Batman TV series, which ran from 1966 to 1968, was deliberately campy (“To the Batpole!”) and created a long-enduring association between the superhero and the cartoonish onomopeias “Pow!” “Zap!” and “Wham!”

The story of how the farcical Batman of the ’60s transformed into the solemn one of today mirrors the elevation of the comic book in general from belittled kiddie fare to the subject of academic inquiry and box-office-breaking, R-rated action movies. It’s also a story of a 73-year-old franchise returning to its roots, reflecting its times, and helping build a multibillion dollar industry that churns out branded merchandise, video games, theme park attractions and annual conventions. And it’s the story of one fan named Michael Uslan, who, as an 8th grader in the ’60s, made a vow to save Batman.

Read more.

Never realized one person was so instrumental to how Batman has been adapted on the big screen.  I also love his method of creating controversy in the middle.

July 3, 2012 10:44 pm
New Facebook Study Reveals Motivation Behind Facebook Visits | WebProNews

Published this month in the Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, a new Facebook study suggests personality type determines how much time you spend on the social networking site and how often you visit.

At the root of the study, its authors hoped to uncover the reasons why so many users flock to the site and spend time there, or rather, what are the motivations behind the phenomenon.

The study by the University of Connecticut’s Daniel Hunt and Archana Krishnan and Michigan State’s David Atkin found that much of what caused people to spend time on Facebook could be traced back to personality and a desire to be entertained.

The authors comment on the results from the study:

“The entertainment motive was shown to be the most powerful predictor of how much time participants spent on Facebook,”

“If individuals are using Facebook for entertainment purposes, this differs from cases where it’s being used to maintain relationships. For example, individuals may use Facebook in a similar fashion to a blog or to promote their viewpoints.”

Looking at motivational factors that could encourage individuals to spend time on Facebook, the researchers found that entertainment and passing time, along with information seeking, to be the top driving forces for visiting the social site. So, in other words, people are just looking to keep themselves occupied and entertained.

While self expression was mentioned in the study a possible factor for visiting Facebook, limitations of the design kept the authors from formulating any theories on how it actually played into the time spent. Oddly enough, maintaining relationships wasn’t found to be the top factor, as many would expect.

Perhaps we overestimate how important staying connected to people 24/7 is. Everybody is different, but constantly making social comparisons between yourself and others has been found to be unhealthy for many, especially in younger populations where ridicule and persecution are common place for those who go against the mainstream.