Techerous

My name is Bill, I am a recent graduate in Information Sciences and Technology from Penn State University and this is a place for me to post or give my 2 cents on the fascinating world of technology. I am now working for a pretty big technology related company whose name I will leave out just to avoid any possible complications, however far-fetched them happening may be. Music gets included from time to time as well.

August 12, 2014 10:42 pm
Corporate America Hasn't Been Disrupted

It’s hard to say that regulation is what’s making the capital-intensive industries difficult to break into.  Nonetheless, this is a good read and presents a startling image of what is going on.

May 20, 2014 8:39 pm
Fewer than 10 percent ready for the 'new IT' | ZDNet
February 23, 2014 12:34 pm
Windows Phone to get long-awaited enterprise update | PCWorld

I’ve always said the strategy for Windows Phone should be to target the enterprise. The consumer market has been decided, iOS and Android aren’t giving up any ground, go after the users that involuntarily switched off Blackberry. Now the question is is it too late?

January 4, 2014 12:11 pm
The Mobile Only Workplace?

marksbirch:

When laptops started to become more prevalent in corporate America, it brought with it the promise of freedom. That is freedom from the office, freedom from the cubicles farms, and freedom from the the ball and chain of the corporate world, the desktop PC. From executive to sales people to…

November 23, 2013 1:18 am
theatlantic:

Your Job, Their Data: This Might Be the Most Important Story About the Future

All the drones, synthetic biologists, and self-driving cars notwithstanding, the story of how companies quantify, analyze, and try to predict your job performance may be the most important story in technology.
That is to say, when we look back in 20 years about what has changed in our lives, we will be able to find this thread of data-driven personnel decision making as the thing that’s changed people’s lives the most. 
My colleague Don Peck has an unnerving feature in this month’s magazine on precisely this issue: “They’re Watching You At Work.” I highly encourage you to absorb this tale’s anecdotes and data. 
After reading it, your gut may feel optimistic, like his, or queasy, like mine. Because the “Moneyballing” of human resources and corporate management has already begun, and who is going to stop it? 
Peck’s reporting turned up some amazing/horrifying details about the current prevalence of data-driven corporate practices. For example, he writes, “The Las Vegas casino Harrah’s tracks the smiles of the card dealers and waitstaff on the floor (its analytics team has quantified the impact of smiling on customer satisfaction).” 
Maybe that’s nice from a bottom-line perspective, but imagine working at Harrah’s: "Hey, Alexis, your smile ratio was down today. Keep those lip corners up, buddy!"
Do we want to live in that world?
Read more. [Image: Shutterstock]

theatlantic:

Your Job, Their Data: This Might Be the Most Important Story About the Future

All the drones, synthetic biologists, and self-driving cars notwithstanding, the story of how companies quantify, analyze, and try to predict your job performance may be the most important story in technology.

That is to say, when we look back in 20 years about what has changed in our lives, we will be able to find this thread of data-driven personnel decision making as the thing that’s changed people’s lives the most. 

My colleague Don Peck has an unnerving feature in this month’s magazine on precisely this issue: “They’re Watching You At Work.” I highly encourage you to absorb this tale’s anecdotes and data. 

After reading it, your gut may feel optimistic, like his, or queasy, like mine. Because the “Moneyballing” of human resources and corporate management has already begun, and who is going to stop it? 

Peck’s reporting turned up some amazing/horrifying details about the current prevalence of data-driven corporate practices. For example, he writes, “The Las Vegas casino Harrah’s tracks the smiles of the card dealers and waitstaff on the floor (its analytics team has quantified the impact of smiling on customer satisfaction).” 

Maybe that’s nice from a bottom-line perspective, but imagine working at Harrah’s: "Hey, Alexis, your smile ratio was down today. Keep those lip corners up, buddy!"

Do we want to live in that world?

Read more. [Image: Shutterstock]

August 28, 2013 11:21 pm
Science Fiction Meets The Cloud - BMC Software

Great read for any IT professional, decent analysis of where we’re at what that means we might be heading towards.

April 29, 2012 1:05 pm
Why is Silicon Valley silent on CISPA?

This is why we have to find a way to get everyone’s attention this time. Unlike what I’m seeing a lot of people say, the truth is these bills are very different, particularly in that this one actually benefits companies. The fact that it negatively impacts your privacy doesn’t concern them. There isn’t going to be a Google or Twitter joining in on a blackout date to reach the apathetic masses. I want to believe that this will get crushed by the senate/president as they claim, but let’s not leave it up to them and create another fight. SOPA proved that people do care about online rights and honestly this bill attacks ones that probably affect them more.

April 18, 2012 8:47 pm
The Jig Is Up: Time to Get Past Facebook and Invent a New Future - Alexis Madrigal - Technology - The Atlantic

“For at least five years, we’ve been working with the same operating logic in the consumer technology game. This is what it looks like:

There will be ratings and photos and a network of friends imported, borrowed, or stolen from one of the big social networks. There will be an emphasis on connections between people, things, and places. That is to say, the software you run on your phone will try to get you to help it understand what and who you care about out there in the world. Because all that stuff can be transmuted into valuable information for advertisers.”

April 6, 2012 2:25 pm
Silicon Valley is desperate for talented designers - Apr. 6, 2012

I can definitely see this happening, given the capabilities of HTML5 and other new technologies. Simply making a website or interface more functional isn’t enough anymore. I find the comment about the lack of “good” designers interesting though. I have at least 3 very good friends that are in this field whose work I consider to be absolutely brilliant. I suppose to draw a person in takes more than they even realize. Still it would be interesting to see how or if this trend will apply to established corporations. Sure Google and Apple are on the train, but they’ve always operated more in the startup style. I can say from my personal experience that the fairly big company I work for does seem to be valuing creativity and uniqueness in their employees, though that might be more about decision-making and management.

February 1, 2012 12:15 am
Obama callls on Congress to pass bill aimed at helping startups | VentureBeat

I’m a fan of the equipment deduction part. It is necessary for everyone to have a basic MS Office suite now and when licensing it for a company it can get expensive. Considering the technology aspect of msot start-ups today I don’t know if this addresses the skillset problems a lot of out of work American’s have so hopefully legislation that answers that comes up as well.