Techerous

My name is Bill, I am a recent graduate in Information Sciences and Technology from Penn State University and this is a place for me to post or give my 2 cents on the fascinating world of technology. I am now working for a pretty big technology related company whose name I will leave out just to avoid any possible complications, however far-fetched them happening may be. Music gets included from time to time as well.

May 25, 2012 4:17 pm
Reddit Founder And Activists Aim To Build A 'Bat-Signal For The Internet' - Forbes

On the large scale this seems like a good idea. I don’t know how many sites will be willing to insert code that could possibly change the entire appearance of their site. You never know when you’re going to disagree with this group on something, there should really be a democratic process on deciding when to “turn on the signal” or at least give the site owner the option to choose support or not before it shows up. Since it’s unlikely any big corporations would join in on anything that could be as potentially risky as this I can’t see it really reaching the largely apathetic masses.

3:26 pm
thedailywhat:

CISPA Update of the Day: CISPA, the Cyber Information Sharing and Protection Act that passed the House in April, likely is headed for a Senate vote in early June.
To drum up opposition to the legislation, which would create “a ‘cybersecurity’ exemption to all existing laws,” Fight for the Future, Democrats.com, The Liberty Coalition, and the Entertainment Consumers Association have created a new website called Privacy Is Awesome. The site outlines the top five ways to help defeat CISPA:
Call your senators and tell them to oppose the Lieberman-Collins bill (CISPA), and ask for a constituent meeting during the Memorial Day recess to help change their mind.
Email senators offices about CISPA, expressing your opposition.
Keep calling senators until they plan a constituent meeting.
Donate to anti-CISPA organizers — the same teams that helped defeat SOPA/PIPA.
Share your opposition online — Facebook, Twitter, etc.
Meanwhile, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., is spearheading opposition to the legislation, concluding a recent Senate floor speech with:

I believe these bills will encourage the development of a cyber security industry that profits from fear and whose currency is Americans private data. These bills create a Cyber Industrial Complex that has an interest in preserving the problem to which it is the solution.

Watch the full video here. It’s terrific.
[death+taxes}

thedailywhat:

CISPA Update of the Day: CISPA, the Cyber Information Sharing and Protection Act that passed the House in April, likely is headed for a Senate vote in early June.

To drum up opposition to the legislation, which would create “a ‘cybersecurity’ exemption to all existing laws,” Fight for the Future, Democrats.com, The Liberty Coalition, and the Entertainment Consumers Association have created a new website called Privacy Is Awesome. The site outlines the top five ways to help defeat CISPA:

  • Call your senators and tell them to oppose the Lieberman-Collins bill (CISPA), and ask for a constituent meeting during the Memorial Day recess to help change their mind.
  • Email senators offices about CISPA, expressing your opposition.
  • Keep calling senators until they plan a constituent meeting.
  • Donate to anti-CISPA organizers — the same teams that helped defeat SOPA/PIPA.
  • Share your opposition online — Facebook, Twitter, etc.

Meanwhile, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., is spearheading opposition to the legislation, concluding a recent Senate floor speech with:

I believe these bills will encourage the development of a cyber security industry that profits from fear and whose currency is Americans private data. These bills create a Cyber Industrial Complex that has an interest in preserving the problem to which it is the solution.

Watch the full video here. It’s terrific.

[death+taxes}

May 2, 2012 11:20 pm
Mozilla Slams CISPA, Breaking Silicon Valley's Silence On Cybersecurity Bill

unexpectedtech:

While the Internet has been bristling with anger over the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, the Internet industry has been either silent or quietly supportive of the controversial bill. With one exception.

Late Tuesday, Mozilla’s Privacy and Public Policy lead sent me the following statement:

While we wholeheartedly support a more secure Internet, CISPA has a broad and alarming reach that goes far beyond Internet security. The bill infringes on our privacy, includes vague definitions of cybersecurity, and grants immunities to companies and government that are too broad around information misuse. We hope the Senate takes the time to fully and openly consider these issues with stakeholder input before moving forward with this legislation.

To be fair they have much less to gain from the bill than Google or Facebook.  It’s still good to have at least 1 major company on the user’s side.

(via unexpectedtech-deactivated20130)

April 29, 2012 1:05 pm
Why is Silicon Valley silent on CISPA?

This is why we have to find a way to get everyone’s attention this time. Unlike what I’m seeing a lot of people say, the truth is these bills are very different, particularly in that this one actually benefits companies. The fact that it negatively impacts your privacy doesn’t concern them. There isn’t going to be a Google or Twitter joining in on a blackout date to reach the apathetic masses. I want to believe that this will get crushed by the senate/president as they claim, but let’s not leave it up to them and create another fight. SOPA proved that people do care about online rights and honestly this bill attacks ones that probably affect them more.

April 26, 2012 10:47 pm
Insanity: CISPA Just Got Way Worse, And Then Passed On Rushed Vote

I honestly don’t know what they’re thinking here.  The disconnect between the house and the general public is unbelievable, do they even watch the news?  If they did this because they think not enough people pay attention to issues like this to matter, prove them wrong internet.  Show them we don’t need wikipedia or google to show us when somebody is losing their basic rights online!

April 25, 2012 2:02 am April 8, 2012 7:50 pm
After killing SOPA, Internet activists take aim at a new House cybersecurity bill

I’m getting really sick of these broadly written bills. Perhaps more so than SOPA, I can’t really disagree with the purpose of this bill, however the fact that the language does not set barriers that could limit personal information about users companies can share and when with the government is really frustrating.  It’s a pretty ridiculous excuse when the lawmakers say that it’s okay because they aren’t going to interpret the law like that.  If that’s the case, why not just change the language to better fit the specific definition that can be agreeable?  I have to stress though, stay informed and read the details for yourself.  Don’t just take everyone calling this “SOPA 2.0” as automatic truth.  Like I said, I can’t disagree with the purpose and the importance of protecting people from hackers, we just need language that maintains the users rights at the same time.