Techerous

My name is Bill, I am a recent graduate in Information Sciences and Technology from Penn State University and this is a place for me to post or give my 2 cents on the fascinating world of technology. I am now working for a pretty big technology related company whose name I will leave out just to avoid any possible complications, however far-fetched them happening may be. Music gets included from time to time as well.

December 12, 2013 12:49 am September 27, 2012 8:22 pm
stoweboyd:

theatlantic:

Facebook Has Officially Popped the Start-Up Bubble

Following Facebook’s IPO we declared a bubble burst and now we’re seeing that hit the start-up ecosystem as investor money becomes harder to find. ”The frothy bubble is over,” an analyst told The Wall Street Journal’s Pui Wing Tam and Amir Efrati. And that defrothing has happened in large part because of Facebook’s performance over the last three months. It’s not just the social network’s stock that has failed to boom in the months following its public offering, fledgling tech companies are now having a hard time raising money, as a result. Rather than just fork over the bucks to an up-and-coming app, investors have a new found curiosity in potential profitability and revenue. See: investors want to put money into companies that will bring mega riches. Before, users were enough to feed those fantasies. But Facebook’s wimpy stock has since crushed that dream, making it harder for these other social media start-ups to convince investors to buy in. 

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

The growth bubble has popped for tech, too, not just in finance and housing.

heeeyyy it finally happened.

stoweboyd:

theatlantic:

Facebook Has Officially Popped the Start-Up Bubble

Following Facebook’s IPO we declared a bubble burst and now we’re seeing that hit the start-up ecosystem as investor money becomes harder to find. ”The frothy bubble is over,” an analyst told The Wall Street Journal’s Pui Wing Tam and Amir Efrati. And that defrothing has happened in large part because of Facebook’s performance over the last three months. It’s not just the social network’s stock that has failed to boom in the months following its public offering, fledgling tech companies are now having a hard time raising money, as a result. Rather than just fork over the bucks to an up-and-coming app, investors have a new found curiosity in potential profitability and revenue. See: investors want to put money into companies that will bring mega riches. Before, users were enough to feed those fantasies. But Facebook’s wimpy stock has since crushed that dream, making it harder for these other social media start-ups to convince investors to buy in. 

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

The growth bubble has popped for tech, too, not just in finance and housing.

heeeyyy it finally happened.

May 18, 2012 12:09 pm
Facebook's IPO and the new tech bubble | Michael Wolff | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk

I don’t believe I’ve seen anyone discuss the positive aspects of a bubble before. It kind of makes sense as a lot of these social media companies are starting to develop tools that fit in more with the definition of web 3.0.

May 2, 2012 1:00 pm
The Big Doubt Over Facebook's IPO - WSJ.com

The IPO hasn’t even hit yet and the signs for the bubble Facebook’s IPO would bring are already showing. It’s funny how as much as people complain about Facebook being invasive and annoying, their breadwinner’s actually want them to be way worse.

September 13, 2011 12:49 am
Bubble Boys

Out in Silicon Valley, the last bastion of full employment, the Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerbergs of the future are staying up all night writing code in dorms.

May 30, 2011 11:20 am

 
Valuations of social media companies are starting to remind us of 1999. But are they overvalued?
Now that Microsoft bought Skype for $8.5 billion, LinkedIn’s IPO valued the company at $8.9 billion after its first day of trading, and Facebook’s estimated value is pushing $100 billion, you might be starting to wonder if buying into user numbers rather than revenue is a good idea.

Valuations of social media companies are starting to remind us of 1999. But are they overvalued?

Now that Microsoft bought Skype for $8.5 billion, LinkedIn’s IPO valued the company at $8.9 billion after its first day of trading, and Facebook’s estimated value is pushing $100 billion, you might be starting to wonder if buying into user numbers rather than revenue is a good idea.

(via appvisor)

May 19, 2011 6:15 pm
LinkedIn Soars in Debut

emergentfutures:

LinkedIn’s stock more than doubled its offering price of $45 a share, closing up $49.25, at $94.25, on the New York Stock Exchange. The shares spurted right at the beginning of trading on Thursday, opening at $83 and reaching as high as $122.70 during the morning.

Paul Higgins: Real or Bubble?

Full Story: New York Times

As I’ve been saying for the past half a year, this web 2.0 stuff is bubbling.  Maybe LinkedIn got valued at this because old business people are the only ones that haven’t figured out how to tune out online advertising yet haha.

April 21, 2011 12:39 pm
Tech jobs boom like it's 1999

I was hoping for a better click-though link in the quote but it doesn’t seem to have one so I’ll post the whole article as well.  This is pretty sweet, though considering how many of these companies fall into the “web 2.0” category it does have me somewhat concerned of it being another bubble sign.  I know my dad, who started his career as an electrical engineer, has always said things don’t stay in the engineer’s power for too long so we’ll see if this lasts.

March 27, 2011 7:23 pm
futuramb:

Facebook and Twitter Valuations May Show a New Tech Bubble - NYTimes.com
OK, it is maybe time for a pop??

Wow, totally answers my question a few days ago.

futuramb:

Facebook and Twitter Valuations May Show a New Tech Bubble - NYTimes.com

OK, it is maybe time for a pop??

Wow, totally answers my question a few days ago.

(via emergentfutures)

March 24, 2011 3:49 pm

Bubbles

It has recently occurred to me that if there is any keyword being thrown carelessly around in the technology world as of late it is “bubble.” Go on any blog within the past 10 or so months and I guarantee you’ll find something with the word combination’s web 2.0 bubble, social media bubble, technology bubble, internet bubble, software bubble, apps bubble, silicon valley bubble and of course a variety of other terms followed by the word, bubble.  While I am relatively young and new to the technology blogging scene I can definitely see the comparisons of now to the situation we were in during the dreaded late-90s. In fact, I even reposted an article supporting the subject some months back. Does this really mean that these are signs of a repeat though?  A lot of it could just be how the business works rather than the indications of the big picture.  What does everyone else think, just a bunch of easy smoke everyone is grabbing or a real problem growing more prevalent across the entire technology field?