Techerous

My name is Bill, I am a recent graduate in Information Sciences and Technology from Penn State University and this is a place for me to post or give my 2 cents on the fascinating world of technology. I am now working for a pretty big technology related company whose name I will leave out just to avoid any possible complications, however far-fetched them happening may be. Music gets included from time to time as well.

January 8, 2014 10:37 pm January 5, 2014 10:44 pm

Film Recommendation: Her (2013)

While this is a technology blog, I just wanted to take some time to recommend a movie that I feel those who think like me would enjoy.  I saw “Her” about a week ago at one of the few theater’s it has been released in and was absolutely floored.  I don’t believe I have seen a film so well thought out and human in years.  Like all great science fiction stories, it is more about ourselves than the advanced technology it is predicting.  That is not to say it doesn’t do a brilliant job visualizing where we are going with information technology.  There are more than a handful of moments that I chuckled at how easily I could see a machine being used like the movie does in the future or at how the characters reacted to what they had.  The performances are excellent, both the ones we can see in the perfectly awkward Joaquin Phoenix and Amy Adams as well as just the voice of Scarlett Johansson.  This is a concept that could have fallen apart with any single misstep but all of the actors keep it perfectly believable.  Not to downplay the excellence of Spike Jonze’s writing and direction which as I said earlier display some of the best thought out work I’ve seen in years.  Ultimately, it is a brilliant statement to what we are looking for in terms of love and satisfaction in the information age, something that has been discussed and pondered often today and all of time before it.  In a season of many excellent looking movies, I implore you to please not pass this movie up and check it out as I have never been so sure a movie has something that everyone can relate to.

5/5 stars (for those that prefer numerical rating systems)

June 28, 2012 9:05 pm
thedailywhat:

Even Computers Love Cats of the Day: 16,000 linked Google computers, 10 million random YouTube thumbnail images, and over a billion connections in between led to one result: the computers, without human guidance, learned what a cat is.
Google’s attempt of simulating the human brain, with thousands of processors in conjunction with thinking software, discovered the house cat. It’s a huge step forward in computing, and the best part is…it’s learning.
[smithsonian]

Same story I posted a couple of days ago, but this one has a picture of a cat, let’s see how it does now!

thedailywhat:

Even Computers Love Cats of the Day: 16,000 linked Google computers, 10 million random YouTube thumbnail images, and over a billion connections in between led to one result: the computers, without human guidance, learned what a cat is.

Google’s attempt of simulating the human brain, with thousands of processors in conjunction with thinking software, discovered the house cat. It’s a huge step forward in computing, and the best part is…it’s learning.

[smithsonian]

Same story I posted a couple of days ago, but this one has a picture of a cat, let’s see how it does now!

June 27, 2012 6:57 pm
"Presented with 10 million digital images found in YouTube videos, what did Google’s brain do? What millions of humans do with YouTube: looked for cats."

In a Big Network of Computers, Evidence of Machine Learning - NYTimes.com

Even artificial intelligence loves looking up cats

(via infoneer-pulse)

June 22, 2012 2:01 am
theatlantic:

What Happens When We Turn the World’s Most Famous Robot Test on Ourselves?

This weekend marks the centenary of Alan Turing’s birth. Turing was one of the greatest computer scientist of all time. In a 1950 paper that outlined what has come to be known as the Turing Test he offered a way out of endless philosophical speculation about whether computers could ever be classed as ‘intelligent.’ He said that if human judges ask interview questions of a hidden computer and a hidden person and cannot tell the difference after five minutes, the computer should be considered intelligent. Nowadays, programmers compete yearly for the Loebner Prize, which is won by the computer that is most often mistaken for a human. 
But the Turing Test’s application is no longer limited to questions of artificial intelligence: Social scientists too are getting in on the action and using the test in a completely new way — to compare different human subjects and their ability to pass as members of groups to which they do not belong, such as religious and ethnic minorities or particular professional classes. With the Turing Test, sociologists can compare the extent to which subjects can understand people who are different from them in some way.
Read more. [Image: Anton Zabielskyi/Shutterstock/Rebecca J. Rosen]

theatlantic:

What Happens When We Turn the World’s Most Famous Robot Test on Ourselves?

This weekend marks the centenary of Alan Turing’s birth. Turing was one of the greatest computer scientist of all time. In a 1950 paper that outlined what has come to be known as the Turing Test he offered a way out of endless philosophical speculation about whether computers could ever be classed as ‘intelligent.’ He said that if human judges ask interview questions of a hidden computer and a hidden person and cannot tell the difference after five minutes, the computer should be considered intelligent. Nowadays, programmers compete yearly for the Loebner Prize, which is won by the computer that is most often mistaken for a human. 

But the Turing Test’s application is no longer limited to questions of artificial intelligence: Social scientists too are getting in on the action and using the test in a completely new way — to compare different human subjects and their ability to pass as members of groups to which they do not belong, such as religious and ethnic minorities or particular professional classes. With the Turing Test, sociologists can compare the extent to which subjects can understand people who are different from them in some way.

Read more. [Image: Anton Zabielskyi/Shutterstock/Rebecca J. Rosen]

(via michpalmer)

November 6, 2011 2:50 am
emergentfutures:

MIT researchers develop self-programming AI video game
What if programming a video-game AI could use an algorithm to figure things out for itself, extrapolating from a few decisions made by players  — and even reuse those lessons from one game to the next?
”Robotany,” a game prototype from the Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab, wants to answer those questions. Set in a garden, the game features small, robot-like creatures that take care of plants
Full Story: Kurzweil

emergentfutures:

MIT researchers develop self-programming AI video game

What if programming a video-game AI could use an algorithm to figure things out for itself, extrapolating from a few decisions made by players  — and even reuse those lessons from one game to the next?

”Robotany,” a game prototype from the Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab, wants to answer those questions. Set in a garden, the game features small, robot-like creatures that take care of plants

Full Story: Kurzweil

(via thebigapp)